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Aerial Lineman pay scale
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Blue Springs Mo
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    11

    Default Aerial Lineman pay scale

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    Been thinking about applying for an aerial lineman position at AIR2. Does anyone have any idea what the pay is for that type of work? Is it compareable to a distribution lineman pay ($32-$34hr) or are you compensated for the risk of being in a chopper?
    www.linemansapparel.com

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    687

    Default I think you are right on @ $32-$34hr

    Quote Originally Posted by pedrosalazar View Post
    Been thinking about applying for an aerial lineman position at AIR2. Does anyone have any idea what the pay is for that type of work? Is it compareable to a distribution lineman pay ($32-$34hr) or are you compensated for the risk of being in a chopper?
    Here is how I figure it. The median lineworker makes 26$/Hr. 25% hazzard pay bonus is only payable when the helo is flying so slow it can not autorotate down. The jack booted managment pricks will come back at you saying flying is safer than climbing or traveling in a skidder bucket. Estimate 26*1.25 is $32.5 per hour or it could go as high as $40.

    Here is where I get my numbers from Pedro.
    http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos195.htm#earnings
    Earnings for line installers and repairers are higher than those in most other occupations that do not require postsecondary education. Median hourly earnings for electrical power-line installers and repairers were $24.41 in May 2006. The middle 50 percent earned between $18.73 and $28.90. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $13.96, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $34.20. Median hourly earnings in the industries employing the largest numbers of electrical power-line installers and repairers in May 2006 are shown below:
    Electric power generation, transmission, and distribution $25.90
    Wired telecommunications carriers 24.82
    Local government 23.06
    Building equipment contractors 22.04
    Utility system construction 19.29
    Many line installers and repairers belong to unions, principally the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, and the Utility Workers Union of America. For these workers, union contracts set wage rates, wage increases, and the time needed to advance from one job level to the next.
    Good health, education, and vacation benefits are common in the occupation.

    It looks like the Feds will give you 25% bonus for hazzard pay:
    http://www.fs.fed.us/fire/ibp/person...%20Flights.doc Flying. Individuals, except pilots, who are participating in limited control or low-level flights.

    The hazard pay is related to the use of the aircraft not the work of the occupants. If the flight is undertaken under unusual and adverse conditions which threaten or severely limit control of the aircraft, then hazard pay is warranted. Hazard pay is not authorized for situations such as flying passengers from a work center to a location to fix equipment and when there are no adverse conditions that threaten or severely limit the aircraft.

    http://training.fws.gov/Admin/Fire/t.../chapter1H.pdf

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Blue Springs Mo
    Posts
    11

    Talking

    Just posted a few minutes ago, thanks for the quick response and info
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Cal
    Posts
    480

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CPOPE View Post
    Here is how I figure it. The median lineworker makes 26$/Hr. 25% hazzard pay bonus is only payable when the helo is flying so slow it can not autorotate down. The jack booted managment pricks will come back at you saying flying is safer than climbing or traveling in a skidder bucket. Estimate 26*1.25 is $32.5 per hour or it could go as high as $40.

    Here is where I get my numbers from Pedro.
    http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos195.htm#earnings
    Earnings for line installers and repairers are higher than those in most other occupations that do not require postsecondary education. Median hourly earnings for electrical power-line installers and repairers were $24.41 in May 2006. The middle 50 percent earned between $18.73 and $28.90. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $13.96, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $34.20. Median hourly earnings in the industries employing the largest numbers of electrical power-line installers and repairers in May 2006 are shown below:
    Electric power generation, transmission, and distribution $25.90
    Wired telecommunications carriers 24.82
    Local government 23.06
    Building equipment contractors 22.04
    Utility system construction 19.29
    Many line installers and repairers belong to unions, principally the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, and the Utility Workers Union of America. For these workers, union contracts set wage rates, wage increases, and the time needed to advance from one job level to the next.
    Good health, education, and vacation benefits are common in the occupation.

    It looks like the Feds will give you 25% bonus for hazzard pay:
    http://www.fs.fed.us/fire/ibp/person...%20Flights.doc Flying. Individuals, except pilots, who are participating in limited control or low-level flights.

    The hazard pay is related to the use of the aircraft not the work of the occupants. If the flight is undertaken under unusual and adverse conditions which threaten or severely limit control of the aircraft, then hazard pay is warranted. Hazard pay is not authorized for situations such as flying passengers from a work center to a location to fix equipment and when there are no adverse conditions that threaten or severely limit the aircraft.

    http://training.fws.gov/Admin/Fire/t.../chapter1H.pdf
    None of that crap above has anything to do with this......

    There are very few Lineman, and very few pilots, who actually do this for a living. I'm not sure what Air2 pays, but this is our pay and the story behind it. In California, there are only about 100 people trained to do this. The original negotiations were this.....double time all day, a 1 million dollar insurance policy........
    what came out in the end ( a sellout by the Union ) was 10% for the day and no insurance policy. That equals out to about $35 a day before taxes, and after taxes.......about $18........for doing this procedure that saves a company millions....................!

    No one would do the work under these conditions so they decided to give us a 5% raise, year round to entice the crews to do the work, mind you, it is all voluntary.
    A helicopter, by nature is like a Bumble bee, shouldn't be able to fly! I also say that it is 100,000 bolts, ready to fly apart at any moment......When you put it into a wire environment, it is the ultimate danger situation.
    After saying all that, it's very mundane, and very uneventful doing this....
    Our double time rate is $100.06 per hour......that's marching or fighting.
    So for all of you who think you're all that.......................
    This is the ultimate..................
    Last edited by barehander; 06-05-2011 at 01:10 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    687

    Default crap above has anything to do with this?

    THanks for giving me your numbers Barehander. I was taking a Swag and I wonder if the pay scale at Air2 matches what your pulling down.

    You are absolutly correct about it saving the utility big $ over traditional live line maintiance.

    Takes balls, helicopter work. I've flown a few patrols as an observer back in the 90's for NewEngland Power. LiveLine is not somthing I could do.

    Did you hear about this XMISSION Line-Helo mantiance crash last Thursday?
    Sounds like the line mechanic on the skid was thrown clear and the two guys in the Copter are hurtin. Say a prayer for them.

    http://www.news.com.au/adelaidenow/s...006301,00.html
    November 20, 2008 01:05am
    "ONE man is fighting for his life and two others were injured in a helicopter crash near Murray Bridge yesterday.

    The ETSA sub-contractors were flying between rows of 10m-high powerlines about 11.54am when a rotor blade struck the cables and sent the helicopter hurtling to the ground.
    One man working outside the cabin on a protruding metal platform was thrown clear by the impact.

    Passing motorist Shay Thomas-Rample made a frantic emergency call as the two others remained trapped beneath the wreck.

    "The more I looked at it (the flying helicopter), the more I thought `that's pretty close, too close'," she said.

    "The next thing I knew it clipped the lines with its rotor and then just flipped in the air and hit the ground."

    One blade snapped off the aircraft and landed about 100m away. The tail section was also broken off in the crash.

    A crane was called to help free the trapped men, who were flown to Flinders Medical Centre by the Adelaide Bank Rescue Helicopter. The most seriously hurt suffered major head and chest injuries and remains in a critical condition.

    Superintendent Tom Rieniets said the man thrown clear was walking around and worried about his workmates when police arrived.

    "We spoke to him and tried to ascertain what happened and he was in an advanced state of shock," Supt Rieniets said. "He was more concerned about his two mates in the helicopter and was very glad to see us on scene."

    The accident occurred in sheep-grazing land near Wagenknecht Rd, about 8km north of Murray Bridge.

    Police, ambulance crews and SES volunteers attended the scene.

    ETSA says it sub-contracted the work on behalf of ElectraNet, which operates the state's high-voltage transmission lines.

    The cause of the crash will be investigated by experts from the Australian Transport Safety Bureau."

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    massachusetts
    Posts
    275

    Talking Arieal Pay

    We have AIR2 on our job for about 8 months. I believe their scale is $32. p/h plus perdeim and they pay for the rooms. 21 on 10 off. they pay the airfare to and from worksites on your 10 off. They are non-union. Do not know nothing about their benifiets. For what they get a day for chopper and crew vs what the crew gets I am telling you, they( the crew ) are on on the short end of the stick.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Blue Springs Mo
    Posts
    11

    Default

    Thanks for the info CPOPE,BAREHANDER & STINGER, called a couple of these outfits and none will give you a quote on pay.
    Last edited by pedrosalazar; 11-23-2008 at 10:41 PM.
    www.linemansapparel.com

  8. #8

    Default

    You need every cent for doing that kind of work ,one of the companies in our area had a helicopter come down on a feeder patrol, one guy had his brain injured so bad he cannot remember what was said 5 minutes ago now i believe hes in a home for the brain injured.

    And i read another helicopter come down in South Australia this week injuring the crew doing aerial feeder patrols,seems this work is extremely hazardous and thats only flying aerial patrols , no direct contact work.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    687

    Default Do the blades spin clockwise or counter clockwise

    Sorry to tell you one of your countrymen died in the helo accident last Thursday. Check out the posting under the safet thread.

    Hey aussie trblman I think you are right about the hazzard. 4 the amount of work completed overall I believe it is still less hazardous than a foot patrol and hacking tempoary roads through right of ways.

    Don't get me wrong, all I'm saying is that if you were to complete the same ammount of work patrolling and live line maintaining with buckets log skidders and hot sticks it would take more people to accomplish the tasks and it's likely there would be a net sum greater ammount of injuries.

    I would rather see us employ more line hands using old school techniques. Nothin better than 4 wheeling in a ROW hunting down a line fault. Overall you get more done cheeper with fewer people hurt and killed using the chopper.

    On a side note::
    I was under the misconception that water swirls down the drain or in the toilet. North of the Equator, the water swirls counter-clockwise; south of the Equator, the water swirls clockwise. AKA toilets flushe backwards down under and I figured the helocopter blades also might also need to run backwards. Looked it up and I'm wrong? Brain cramp

    "it's a common mistake that the direction water travels when a toilet, sink or bathtub empties is different in the Northern hemisphere where the USA is from the Southern hemisphere where Australia is. This is often attributed to the Coriolis force and even some teachers incorrectly tell their students this. The Coriolis force only acts on large bodies such as the earth. Things such as toilets, bathtubs, and sinks are too small to be affected. What causes the water to spin clockwise or anti-clockwise is simply how the container is made and how the water empties from it."

    "The Coriolis Force is not a real force but is a matter of positional realitivity on a spinning spherical surface (such as the surface of the earth)
    If you were to start at the north pole and walk directly south with no external forces acting on you - you would start to see (the farther south you went) that the earth would start moving faster and faster, west to east, beneath your feet. This is because the earth is spinning and you are stationary. This is not what happens in real life of course. If you started at the north pole and walked directly southward you would maintain your frame of reference with the earth, assuming the same west-east velocity as the earth to keep yourself stationary with the piece of earth surface you are currently on. In other words not only do you walk southwards but you also accelerate yourself to an west-east velocity to match the earth's velocity. Believe it or not but it is easier (less energy) to walk west-east or east-west than north-south or south-north because you don't have to change your velocity."

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    All the way northwest
    Posts
    30

    Default

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    Well I can tell you that the utility i work for pays pretty well for us doing helo work. We are the biggest utility in north. cali. Our base is 45 an hour plus an extra 10% an hour. Our method however is dangling from a load line, not sitting on a skid. We Have multiple ways to use this method,ie mid span work structure to structure, structure to ground,and just about anything that we can think of to make it safer and less strenuouse on us. We have had close calls with the chopper, no fatalities to date, Our safetyprogram to be involed in this work is very strict. Altough a rush when under the bird you must always focus. Very fun. Goodluck in your search.