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  1. Default Rope question for those who "know the knot"

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    I was doing some ground level training with an apprentice today. Secondary racks 5' high to work on using blocks, grips, crimp splices etc. At one point I was explaining how if you had a midspan break with more slack to pull out than your trouble blocks could take up, you could tie a bunch of half hitches on the conductor and secure it to the pole while you rigged up the blocks for another bite. So he tied a clove hitch instead of the half hitches. I'm not a whiz with ropes, but I know all the knots I was taught in my apprenticeship and I seem to remember my old instructor saying clove hitches were not that reliable and were only used for tying things down that were not critical. I use other knots for this too, but the half hitches I can tie with one hand and they work well for me. I never dropped a wire in the street yet.

    Any thoughts on this? I don't really want to make an issue with the guy if he is comfortable with that knot and it holds. Some info on the net says the clove hitch is akin to the sheepshank and not compatible with todays synthetic ropes.

  2. #2
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    Default 2016

    It's 2016 . Ever hear of a " come along clamp". Or Klein clamp. ???? Tieing knots on conductor is SOOOOOOO LAST CENTURY ,..
    IF IT WASN'T FOR BAD LUCK WE WOULD HAVE NO LUCK AT ALL. !

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    We call them, "pork chops". It's obviously a great idea. It's just that in these parts, everyone ties stuff. Put it on a hand line to pull up a wire from the ground, why not. We just always tied stuff. I have safety in mind lately because a few weeks back a contractor dropped a guy wire into a 26kv bushing on one of our transformers. No one got hurt but it was the LOUDEST bang I've heard in 30 years of my career.



    Quote Originally Posted by bren guzzi View Post
    It's 2016 . Ever hear of a " come along clamp". Or Klein clamp. ???? Tieing knots on conductor is SOOOOOOO LAST CENTURY ,..

  4. #4
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    I've used half hitches, clove hitches, grips, preforms, whatever works for the particular situation you have....... If you use a clove hitch just back it up with a half hitch. A rolling hitch, timber hitch or "grapevine" works too.......
    "It is not the critic who counts:The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena" Teddy Roosevelt

  5. #5
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    We learned to stick the end through the strand after tying what ever knot you want. It makes the knot more secure, the tail is controlled when pulling up the wire and it pulls off easy if you pull towards the end or pole.

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    Thanks guys!

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    If there was a lot of wire burnt, I'd just use my grunt, a handline and a timber hitch to bring up the longest span of the wire. splice in the wire I wanted, then hook up my slack blocks to the new wire, with my 6 or 8 ft Snatch Blocks I always kept in my bucket, and pull it up and make the last splice. My Blocks were always Manila rope too. Never like that nylon rope shit. it Slips. Also used ONLY these Blocks...for a Double Lock on the rope. Those that know these Blocks...Know what I'm talkin about. I called em, "Duck Bills". AND...Attached is a picture of a REAL Handline HOOK! Like I said...I don't know a lineman nowdays that can make up a REAL Braded ACTUAL Handline! Let alone MAKE up a set of Snatch Blocks. Pittiful.....
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    Last edited by Old Line Dog; 04-14-2016 at 10:10 PM.
    “He who dares not offend, cannot be honest”
    ~ Thomas Paine ~

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Old Line Dog View Post
    If there was a lot of wire burnt, I'd just use my grunt, a handline and a timber hitch to bring up the longest span of the wire. splice in the wire I wanted, then hook up my slack blocks to the new wire, with my 6 or 8 ft Snatch Blocks I always kept in my bucket, and pull it up and make the last splice. My Blocks were always Manila rope too. Never like that nylon rope shit. it Slips. Also used ONLY these Blocks...for a Double Lock on the rope. Those that know these Blocks...Know what I'm talkin about. I called em, "Duck Bills". AND...Attached is a picture of a REAL Handline HOOK! Like I said...I don't know a lineman nowdays that can make up a REAL Braded ACTUAL Handline! Let alone MAKE up a set of Snatch Blocks. Pittiful.....
    I agree not all Journeymen Lineman anymore can actually splice an eye on a rope,like i was told there are A lineman out there,B,C,and even a few D lineman out there.Sad if you can't splice an eye in a rope.My foreman when i started said you didn't pass if you couldn't splice an eye in a Handline.The real Question is why would you not sit down and learn it.One thing that always bothered me was make it big enough to be able to take it through the the eye and back over the grip for an easy attachment….
    Birdog37: "Remember we're all on a journey in life, the only difference is, some people know it and some people don't."

  9. #9

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    Over the last couple years, I've read a lot of posts similar to this one. It's always about an older lineman complaining about the younger lineman or apprentices not knowing things. Well, the way I see it, that means you have failed as an older lineman. It was your duty and responsibility to train the younger guys coming up just as the older guys trained you. Every apprentice I've ever had under my care can do anything that's asked of them. Why? Because it was my job to train them to do every thing I possibly could. They are a direct reflection of me and I'll be damned if I'm going to send someone out without teaching them every thing I possibly could.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by TRAMPLINEMAN View Post
    Over the last couple years, I've read a lot of posts similar to this one. It's always about an older lineman complaining about the younger lineman or apprentices not knowing things. Well, the way I see it, that means you have failed as an older lineman. It was your duty and responsibility to train the younger guys coming up just as the older guys trained you. Every apprentice I've ever had under my care can do anything that's asked of them. Why? Because it was my job to train them to do every thing I possibly could. They are a direct reflection of me and I'll be damned if I'm going to send someone out without teaching them every thing I possibly could.
    IBleve Tramp nailed that excellant answer Tramp

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