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  1. #51
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    usa/ Oklahoma
    Posts
    2,221

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    Featured Sponsor

    Everybody knows troublemen are a bunch of girlie boys.

  2. #52
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    South East Texas
    Posts
    3,278

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    Ummmmmmm Girlie boys? Nah... jusa hairy legged lineman wif branes.

  3. #53
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Buffalo
    Posts
    3,000

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    Quote Originally Posted by wtdoor67 View Post
    Everybody knows troublemen are a bunch of girlie boys.
    gotta admitt, I have gotten in touch with my feminine side a couple times on trouble

  4. #54

    Default we are all lineman,arent we?

    Quote Originally Posted by Fudd29 View Post
    I am a troubleman and believe me, I wish I could go back to being a lineman. We work rotating swing shifts, work alone constantly, do all the switching for the crews who won't work anything hot anymore. I do agree that a troubleman deserves more pay. Even when I was a lineman, I was sometimes upgraded to T-man for a day at a time or even up to a couple of weeks. You run your ass off.
    to me its not important,ive been exposed to both,line-crew,and troubleshooter,2 man crew,and so on,and i think a lineman that is capable of doing both is a well trained hand,i used to think that way,but most,thats the key-word,most trouble-shooters are pretty sharp,sure some are lazy,but some ,or most of the guys i know are pretty sharp,lineman on line-crews are the same way,some slower than others,some slow,personally,im not the kind to want to impress,im there to get paid,and make a living,and to do a good job,and safe job,its weather being a lineman on a crew or a troubleshooter,both are needed.as i got older,why would i want to build a line ,just to build another one,it gets old,on the trouble guys part,your working alone,maybe 3 am in the morning,up a 45 foot pole changing out bad clamps,ectone thing you learn is,its all you,nobody to ask,nobody to warn you of hazards,nobody to fetch,climbing at night,dont look around,its all you,so give these guys a break,i happen to like it,working alone,seems like 1 lazy troubleman ruins things for the good ones,but older hands have seen this,like i have,shooting trouble that the trouble-man missed,i can go on and on,but i wont,give the guys a break,like i said,its not about money,kind of like being in the service,either you go,or you stay home,its not about the money.

  5. #55

    Default a few points to think about

    Quote Originally Posted by hotwiretamer View Post
    Our company is real close to creating a Troubleman's position and rumor has it that it will probably be 104% of lineman scale. Up untill this point we have had a "service truck" that the lineman would rotate on every two months or so. (some districts leave the servicemen on forever.) The servicemen handle small jobs like services, D to D lights, meets with electricians, etc. They also are called when there is a trouble call that comes in during business hours. (After hours we have a lineman on call). When they create the troubleman's position the person awarded the job will be doing the exact same thing. Why does he deserve more pay? Troublework is a lot easier than line work, and you rarely work hot primary. The district that keeps the service truck running with the same guy all the time is because he doesn't really work well with others and the forman would rather not have to deal with him on there crew anyway. So, the way I see it, they're giving the most worthless lineman a pay raise. The only change will be his start time. Rumor also has it that he will start at 9:00 and get off at 8:00 with an hour lunch. 4 tens, M thru Thurs. The other troubleman will work same hours Tues. thru Fri.

    I shot trouble alone for a company for 8 yrs. When I started their was 4 of us working alone. One guy on in day. and 2 at night. We had rotating shifts. on weekend off every 4 weeks.. Then went to 2 and a forced person One at night now Really hard to have a life.
    One starts a 6am in the morning goes to coffee and gets a call to come back for switching orders. REALLY another 30 step switching BOMB. Then at the end of the day they want you to stay late and unswitch it.
    Its not fun to go to a blown 100T fuse on a 19.9/34.5 riser alone. Fuse is violently blown. Dispatcher sais give it a poke. I always had to give it a poke One cant always use an extend-stick so its toss it in with a 12 foot stick and of course it blows back and blows your helmet off. ( I always double ear plug)
    We changed cut-outs out by ourselves, they wanted to make us do riser LAs but that's not good for one person. Can it be done, yes should it be done no.
    Pull up to the HOOD and give them a piece of paper and say your lights are going out for non payment.
    Rainy days/ bad days trouble guy is running around like a nut wile the other guys are doing nothing.
    If I called for a crew or said it needs 2 people; a superviser had to come out and check it to make sure no way I couldn't do it alone.
    Yes it has its good days. When everyone is working and if its slow trouble guy gets a break.

  6. Default

    Iíve been a troubleman for almost 5 years now, I work for a big utility, think I make $1 and change more than a Lineman, 90% of the time my job is easy, the other 10% I earn every bit of it, I miss running a crew but I make more money now, donít work as hard physically and donít have to deal with all the politics. Being a troubleman is easy but it takes time to learn how to be, the hi-lows and the bullshit tags are just busy work and anyone can do that, itís the UG troubleshooting, finding burnt open jumpers in the middle of the night or how you handle CB outages and switching, itís just different and itís not for everyone.

  7. #57

    Default trouble shooting

    Featured Sponsorr

    I did 24 years for a big company in New Hampshire on the crew side.. Then 8 years shooting trouble for a big company in PA. In PA they had a lot of delta primary and seconderies that ran on for 3 blocks. That was a learning experience. It got to the point that the only people they could get to take the position, was people like me from out of company. It was a great position when I started, but they just loaded one guy up with all kinds of work when one didn't have trouble calls of street lights to fix. I got out as soon as I could. 2 years ago.
    keep safe

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